In The Beginning...

Significant European settlement dates in 1847

The first European soldier-settler Fencibles arriving at Waipaparoa-Howick Beach being welcomed by Tara Te Irirangi and Wiremu Te Wheoro on 15th November 1847. Painting by Alan La Roche

8 October: The first Fencible families assigned to Howick arrived in Tamaki Makaurau Auckland’s Waitemata Harbour on the ship Minerva.

18 October: Governor George Grey, Bishop George Selwyn (the first Anglican Bishop of New Zealand), Major Richmond and Felton Mathew (New Zealand’s first Surveyor General) visited and selected a site known as Owairoa Paparoa for settlement.

27 October: A reception for Fencibles and their families was held at St Johns Anglican College at Kohimarama.

28 October: Four carpenters and nine labourers off the ships Minerva and Sir Robert Sale were taken to Owairoa to build two sheds to house new settlers.

15 November: The brigantine Victoria transported the families off the Minerva and Sir Robert Sale to Howick Beach. They were welcomed by Maori iwi chiefs, Wiremu Te Wheoro (Ngati Naho and Ngai Tai), and Tara Te Irirangi (Ngai Tai). November 15 is recognised as Howick’s birthday/anniversary day.

21 November: The first Christian religious service was held at All Saints Church.

2 January, 1848: Father Antonie Marie Garin, a French Roman Catholic priest, arrived with two assistants, built a raupo chapel school and church, and Catholic religious services started.